Marie Manitouabe8ich, Algonquine Abénaquise

Marie Manitouabe8ich, Algonquine Abénaquise

Messagepar jdelisle » 2015-02-15, 19:06

Marie Manitouabe8ich, Algonquine Abénaquise

Outchibahanouk Oueou -
By: Dr. Lorelei A. Lambert


]Today, the descendants of Abenaki who emigrated from Maine together with remnants of other New England tribes are scattered throughout Canada and the United States. Many live on the Reserves of St.Francis and Bécancour in Quebec, where, under the name of Abenaki, their numbers increased over time. Becancour continues to be a site occupied by the Abenaki people of the Wolonik Reserve.The history of Becancour begins with the history of Abenaki people who lived along the Becancour River
at Molina Village at the bay. As the resources in their Aboriginal territory were being destroyed because of wars and encroaching settlements, our Abenaki
ancestors gradually withdrew to Quebec, and settled at Bécancour and Sillery. In 1646 the Jesuits moved their mission to Saint-Francois de Sillery, where the
Christian Hurons sought shelter after being driven out of Saint-Marie by the Iroquois. --(“Our French-Canadian Ancestors" by Thomas J. Laforest; Volume 27- Chapter 8- Page 149) --- A graveyard still exists at the site with graves of children who died from European diseases.Abenaki later abandoned Sillery for St.Francis, near Pierreville, Quebec. Oral histories, historians, Jesuit Relations, and others indicate that Outchibahanouk Banoukoueou“Oueou”, an ancestor claimed by many Abenaki tribal
members, was born to an Abenaki band living along the Becancour River in 1602.
Not much is known about her early life, but it is in Sillery, Quebec, where Outchibahanouk Oueou meets her future husband, Roch Manitoueabeouich. We first hear the name Manitouabewich associated with Olivier LeTardif, the personal representative and interpreter for Samuel de Champlain. Manitouabewich,a young man, of the Huron Nation, was hired as LeTardif's own scout, interpreter, and traveling companion. Manitouabewich had been converted to Christianity by the French missionaries, and as part of the baptismal ritual, had been given the Christian
name of Roch, in honor of St. Roch, the patron saint of dogs and cattle and those who love them.
(http://www.saintspreserved.com/roch/roch.htm)
Francois Derre de Gand was his godfather, from whom he received French clothing.
(http://www.leveillee.net/ancestry/d553c.htm)
Eventually, Roch Manitouabewich settled down to a more domestic way of life in his own Aboriginal territory of the Hurons, the settlement at Sillery near Quebec. It was there that he met and fell in love with Oueou. Although the Jesuit Fathers kept some Records of some baptism and weddings between Native people, and Baptisms of Native children, there is no documented record of the marriage of Roch and Oueou. Roch and Oueou had several children but it is their first-born, Mary, who is the most notable. It is through the Jesuit records now found at the Drouin Records, and the PRDH site in Montreal that know that Roch and Oueou had a daughter. The Jesuits baptized the baby girl with the name Marie and according to the records, Marie was an “Algonquin Manitouabe8ich Abenaquis”. LeTardif became "Godfather" for the baby girl, and in accordance with the custom of the times, LeTardif gave the girl his own name of Olivier. In addition to the name Marie Olivier, the Jesuit missionary performing the baptism gave the girl the name Sylvestre, meaning "one who comes from the forest" or "one who lives in the forest".
(Thwaites, The Jesuit Relations and Allied Documents, volume 11: 1610-1791)
http://puffin.creighton.edu/jesuit/relations/relations_01.html
The Jesuit Relations, describes the Baptism of another one of Outchibahanouk Oueou’s Roch Manitoueabeouich’s children: Francois. On the 14th of the same month, we baptized in our Chapel at Kebec, with the holy ceremonies of the Church, a little child a few months old; its parents had named it Ouasibiskounesout, and Monsieur Gand called it François. This poor little one was very sick, but God soon afterwards restored it to health. It's father's name was Mantoueabeouichit, and its mother's, Outchibahabanoukoueou. They have given [page 91] one of their children, a little girl, to sieur Olivier, who cherishes her tenderly; he provides for her, and is having her brought up in the French way. If this child occasionally goes back to the Cabins of the Savages, her father, very happy to see his daughter well clothed and in very good condition, does not allow her to remain there long, sending her back to the house where she belongs.
(Thwaites, The Jesuit Relations and Allied Documents, volume 11: 1610-1791)

http://puffin.creighton.edu/jesuit/relations/relations_11.html
When Marie Olivier Sylvestre was ten years old, Olivier LeTardif, in his generous way and because of his respect for his friend, Roch Manitouabewich, adopted the young Indian girl as his very own daughter but she never carried the family name of LeTardif. This enabled her to be educated and reared in the same manner as a well-to-do French girl. First he placed her as a "live-in boarder" and student with the Ursuline Nuns at Quebec, and later he boarded her with a French family where she was privately tutored. Marie Olivier Sylvestre met and married Martin Prevost, friend of the Hubou family and a very personal friend of Olivier LeTardif. This marriage was
to be the first marriage on record between an Indian girl and a French colonist. The marriage took place on the third of January 1644 at Quebec. Recorded as witnesses to the ceremony were Olivier LeTardif and Quillaume Couillard,LeTardif’s father in-law.
(Armand Felice:

http://genforum.genealogy.com/prevost/messages/350.html
Marie had 9 children with her husband Martin Prévost. Three of their children died in 1661. A 12 year old daughter, Ursule, died in January 1661. Marie Madeleine a 6 year old girl and her brother Antoine, age 4 died on the same day of March 16,1661. Marie died at 37 years old after giving birth to her last child Therese. Her Marriage certificate to Martin Prevost indicates that she was born in Huron territory, Sillery. There are no records of the death of her parents.
Document from the Drouin Collection indicating Marie Olivier’s death
Cemetery where Marie Olivier Sylvestre’s body is buried
Marie Olivier died at Quebec on 10 Sep 1665 and was buried in the cemetery of the Cote de La Montagne, Quebec.
(h t tp : / /www.ge n e alog ie.o rg / fami l l e /p re vo s t -provost/martin-eng.html)
Many readers of this newsletter probably know this history and controversy. It is not the intent of this article to stir up a hornet’s nest regarding the questions of “Who is Abenaki?” It is written to help us all understand that tribal affiliation 400 years ago was not controversial as it is today. As the Lakota say, “We are all related.”

Dr. Lorelei A. Lambert, PhD, DS, RN
Medical Ecology/Anthropology
Coordinator e-Learning Program
Salish Kootenai College, Pablo, MT 59855


SVP CLIQUER SUR LES LIENS SUIVANTS:
Western Abenaki Indian Tribe Portal Websites
http://www.firstnationsseeker.ca/WesternAbenaki.html
Traduire cette page
Find portal websites to the Western Abenaki Indians of New England with First Nations Seeker's Abenaki page!

Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook-Abenaki People
http://www.cowasuck.org/
Traduire cette page
News, history, language, culture, and links about the Abenaki and Pennacook of Massachusetts.
Puis cliquer sur: Aln8bak News puis sur Aln8bak News Current Issue puis finalement sur Aln8bak News Vol 2010 Issue 3, voir pages 9, 10, 11 [PDF]

NOTES: Marie Manitouabeouich est reconnue comme Abénakise par les Nations Abénakises du Vermont à cause de sa mère qui était algonquine Abénakise née à Bécancour où à l'époque la plupart des indiens de Bécancour étaient Abénaquis. Aussi les descendants de Marie Manitouabeouich au Québec étant reliés aux clans familiaux des Abénakis du Vermont peuvent avoir leur statut d'indien Abénaquis du Vermont .

Bonne lecture et bonnes recherches!
jdelisle
Membre
 
Messages: 220
Inscrit le: 2007-05-21, 19:05

Re: Marie Manitouabe8ich, Algonquine Abénaquise

Messagepar jdelisle » 2015-02-15, 21:53

Étant donné que les liens ci-dessus ne semblent pas activés, voici les liens réactivés.
Vous n'avez qu'à cliquer sur les liens suivants:


(Thwaites, The Jesuit Relations and Allied Documents, volume 11: 1610-1791)
http://puffin.creighton.edu/jesuit/rela ... ns_01.html

he marriage took place on the third of January 1644 at Quebec. Recorded as witnesses to the ceremony were Olivier LeTardif and Quillaume Couillard,LeTardif’s father in-law.
(Armand Felice:

http://genforum.genealogy.com/prevost/messages/350.html

Merci pour votre patience et compréhension!
jdelisle
Membre
 
Messages: 220
Inscrit le: 2007-05-21, 19:05

Re: Marie Manitouabe8ich, Algonquine Abénaquise

Messagepar jdelisle » 2015-02-16, 02:14

Voici un document du généalogiste Léveillée précisant le lieu de naissance des parents de Marie Manitouabeouich dont la mère du nom de Outchibahabanoukoueou est née à Bécancour, territoire des Indiens de Bécancour qui étaient des Abénakis.

1. ROCH(1) MANITOUABEOUICH was born Abt. 1600 in Lake Huron, Ontario, Canada. He married OUTCHIBAHANOUKOUEOU. She was born Abt. 1606 in Baecancour, Quebec, Canada.
He was reportedly baptized on 14 Nov 1636, however this was really his son. His wife was Outchibahanoukoueou. There is no record of their marriage. François Derré de Gand was his son’s godfather, from whom the son received French clothing
Marie Oliver's marriage record gives her origin as "Sauvagesse" and her father is given as Roch Manitouabeouich, origin: Indien. His wife was Outchibahanoukoueou.
By 1639, the Jesuits had established at Sainte-Marie-des-Hurons (Midland Ontario), a post from where they would be able to spread their missionary activities in Huronia. In 1646 the Jesuits had moved their mission to Saint-Francois de Sillery, where the Christian Hurons sought shelter after being driven out of Saint-Marie by the Iroquois. (“Our French-Canadian Ancestors" by Thomas J. Laforest; Volume 27- Chapter 8- Page 149)

Children of ROCH MANITOUABEOUICH and OUTCHIBAHANOUKOUEOU are:
2. i. MARIE SYLVESTRE2 OLIVIER, b. Abt. 1626, St. Andre de Kamouraska, Quebec, Canada; d. 10 Sep 1665, Quebec, Canada.
ii. OUSIBISKOUNESOUT MANITOUABEOUICH, b. Abt. Sep 1637, Quebec, Canada2.
From the Relations:1
On the 14th of the same month, we baptized in our Chapel at Kebec, with the holy ceremonies of the Church, a little child a few months old; its parents had named it Ouasibiskounesout, and Monsieur Gand called it François. This poor little one was very sick, but God soon afterwards restored it to health. It's father's name was Mantoueabeouichit, and its mother's, Outchibahabanoukoueou. They have given [page 91] one of their children, a little girl, to sieur Olivier, who cherishes her tenderly; he provides for her, and is having her brought up in the French way. If this child occasionally goes back to the Cabins of the Savages, her father, very happy to see his daughter well clothed and in very good condition, does not allow her to remain there long, sending her back to the house where she belongs. But to return to our little François. When his parents came back from the woods in the early Spring, Monsieur Gand, who is as charitable as possible to these poor barbarians, recognized his little godson; calling him by name, this poor little fellow answered him falteringly, but in so pretty a way,—he is indeed a very beautiful child,—that Monsieur Gand straightway had a [35] little dress made for him in the French fashion. As soon as he shall be in a condition to be taught, I hope we shall get him for instruction; his father and mother promised this when he was baptized.
Baptism: 11 Nov 1637, Quebec, Quebec, Canada3


Generation No. 2

2. MARIE SYLVESTRE2 OLIVIER (ROCH1 MANITOUABEOUICH) was born Abt. 1626 in St. Andre de Kamouraska, Quebec, Canada, and died 10 Sep 1665 in Quebec, Canada4. She married MARTIN PROVOST 03 Nov 1644 in Quebec, Quebec, Canada4, son of PIERRE PREVOST and CHARLOTTE VIENS. He was born 04 Jan 1611 in France5, and died 27 Jan 1691 in Beauport, Quebec, Canada6.
Her death record the redacteur did not sign. In the margin in another hand is written "Manitouabimich". Her individual entry in the PRDH is #63388 and she is given as an Indian; her birth states only Huronne.
She was named for her godfather Olivier Tardiff. Burial: 12 Sep 1665, Cote de la Montagne Cem. Quebec, Canada7.
MARTIN PROVOST ‘s marriage to Olivier is also given as 3 Mar 1643, Ste. Anne de Beaupre, Montmorncy No. I, Quebec. Martin was a Habitant in Beauport, Quebec in 1681 where he was enumerated a widower with son Jean Pascal age 22, son Jean age 20, daughter Marie age 17 and two Domestic's Jean Proust and Antoine Lesuire ages 25 and 16 respectively, both single males. Burial: 28 Jan 1691, Beauport, Quebec, Canada8 . Marriage: 03 Nov 1644, Quebec, Quebec, Canada8

From the Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online http://www.biographi.ca/EN/index.html:
PRÉVOST (Provost), MARTIN, one of the pioneers of Beauport near Quebec; b. c. 1611, son of Pierre Prévost and Charlotte Vien, of Montreuil-sur-le-Bois-de-Vincennes (now Montreuil-sous-Bois), near Paris; d. 26 Jan. 1691 at Beauport.
Prévost’s presence at Quebec is referred to in the documents of the notary Piraube as early as the year 1639. On 3 Nov. 1644, he married, at Quebec, Marie-Olivier-Sylvestre Manitouabeouich. This is the first marriage between a Frenchman and an Indian mentioned in Canadian historical records. The young bride had been given by her parents to the interpreter Olivier Letardif, who had been her godfather and had then had her brought up as a French girl in the home of Sieur Guillaume Hubou.
From the time of his marriage until his death, we find Martin Prévost settled at Beauport as an “habitant,” or farmer, which did not prevent him from having a piece of land and a house at Quebec in 1667. He was married a second time in 1665, to Marie d’Abancourt, the widow of Jean Jollyet and of Gefroy Guillot. Prévost had had at least nine children by his first wife.
Towards the end of his life, Prévost signed his name “Provost.” His descendants have adopted one or other of the two spellings.
Honorius Provost : JR (Thwaites), IX, 103; XI, 93. Papier terrier de la Cie des I.O. (P.-G. Roy). Jean Langevin, Notes sur les Archives de Notre-Dame de Beauport (Québec, 1860).


SVP vous pouvez cliquer sur le lien complémentaire suivant:
http://www.leveillee.net/ancestry/rochdyer.htm

Merci et bonnes recherches!
jdelisle
Membre
 
Messages: 220
Inscrit le: 2007-05-21, 19:05

Re: Marie Olivier Manitouabeouich , Algonquine

Messagepar Abitawis » 2015-02-17, 15:17

ENGLISH TRANSLATION AT THE BOTTOM

Kwé !

Les Algonquins (Anishinabek), les Abénakis (Alnôbak) et les Hurons (Wendat) étaient au début de la colonisation et sont encore de nos jours identifiés comme étant des nations distinctes les unes des autres.

Ainsi, contrairement à ce qui est affirmée ci-haut, le PRDH (Fiche # 63388 Individu) identifie Marie Olivier Ouchistaouichkoué Manitouabeouich, épouse de Martin Prévost, comme étant une amérindienne « Algonquine » et non pas une « Huronne » ou même une «Abénakise» ou encore moins une « Algonquienne Abénakise ».

Son origine comme Algonquine de Nation est basée sur des documents historiques irréfutables et non sur de la spéculation, des chimères ou des belles histoires.

En effet, il existe bel et bien au moins deux documents historiques originaux disponibles dans les Archives Nationales du Québec qui, sous la signature notariée de Martin Prévost en 1661 et 1668 respectivement, confirment bien clairement qu’elle était une « sauvagesse Algonquine de Nation » et non une « Huronne » ou une « Abénaquise » avec tout le respect dû à ces trois nations dites « sauvage » pour lesquelles on faisait la distinction à l’époque tout comme on le fait encore de nos jours.

Voir les documents de source primaire originaux Français:

En 1661 (avant le décès de Marie Olivier en 1665): http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_cherche ... ide=905539

En 1668 (après le décès de Marie Olivier en 1665) : http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_cherche ... ide=828227

Martin Prévost, époux et père des 8 enfants de Marie Olivier, est la personne la plus compétente et la plus crédible pour confirmer la nation autochtone exacte de son épouse et, ipso facto, celle de ses parents. Il l’a aimé comme épouse pendant 21 années et la connaissait intimement. C’est beaucoup plus que tous les jésuites, curés, notaires, historiens, généalogistes, raconteurs d’histoires et spéculateurs passés et présents tous réunis.

Il est intéressant de noter que quoiqu’elle avait été élevée en grande partie à la « Française » et avait épousé un Français, ces deux (2) documents historiques démontrent clairement que Marie Olivier s’identifiait et a toujours été identifiée toute sa vie, autant par son époux que par les colons Français et la Nation des Algonquins, comme étant une «sauvagesse » de la Nation des Algonquins (Anishinabek).

Elle était Algonquine (Anishinabekwe) à l’époque. Elle demeure Algonquine (Anishinabekwe) aujourd’hui.

Mig8etch !

======================================================
TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE CI-HAUT


Kwey !

The Algonquins (Anishinabek), Abenakis (Alnôbak) and Hurons (Wendat) were at the beginning of the colonisation and still are today identified as distinct nations from one another.

Contrary to what is being asserted above, PRDH (File # 63388 Individual) identifies Marie Olivier Ouchistaouichkoué Manitouabeouich, wife of Martin Prévost, as an “Algonquin Indian” and not as a “Huron”, or an “Abénaki” or even as an “Abenaki Algonquian”.

Her Algonquin Nation origin is based on irrefutable historical documents and not on speculation or imagination or tall tales.

In fact, there are at least two original historical verifiable documents available in the National Archives of Quebec that, under the notarized signature of Martin Prévost in 1661 and 1668 respectively, confirms very clearly that she was a “Savage of the Algonquin Nation” (French: Sauvagesse Algonquine de Nation) and not “Huron” or “Abenaki” all due respect to these three so called “savage” nations that were distinguished from one another at the time and still are today.

Here are the primary source original French documents:

In 1661 (before Marie Olivier death in 1665): http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_cherche ... ide=905539

In 1668 (after Marie Olivier death in 1665): http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_cherche ... ide=828227

Martin Prévost, husband and father of Marie Olivier 8 children, is the most competent and credible person to confirm the exact aboriginal nation of his wife and, ipso facto, that of her parents. He loved her as his wife for 21 years and knew her intimately. This is much more that can be said of all the Jesuits, priests, notaries, historians, genealogists, story tellers and speculators past and present combined.

It is interesting to note that even though she was raised in great part in the French manner and had married a Frenchman, these two (2) documents clearly demonstrate that she identified and was always identified all her life, by her spouse as well as the French colonists and the Algonquin Nation as a “savage” of the Algonquin Nation (Anishinabek).

She was an Algonquin (Anishinabekwe) then. She is an Algonquin (Anishinabekwe) today.

Meegwetch !
Abitawis
Membre
 
Messages: 160
Inscrit le: 2009-06-27, 20:39
Localisation: Outaouais

Re: Marie Manitouabe8ich, Algonquine Abénaquise

Messagepar jdelisle » 2015-02-19, 02:57

Merci pour votre réponse. Les sources que vous citez, j'en ai déjà pris connaissance. Cependant, comme vous le savez, les amérindiens jadis en contexte de survie, se sont mariés entre différentes nations alliées. Aujourd'hui, il n'est pas rare de voir des mariages entre les Abénakis et les Mohawks qui était jadis des ennemis jurés!!!

Personnellement, suite à 6 années d'implication pastorale auprès des Abénakis d'Odanak, plusieurs m'ont fait part qu'ils se considéraient Algonquins provenant de la Nouvelle-Angleterre et de descendance Algonquine ,ce qui est confirmé d'ailleurs dans une lettre des AFFAIRES INDIENNES ET DU NORD CANADA, en date du 14 juin, 2000. Même confirmation dans la lettre pour les Abénakis de Wôlinak.

Source de la lettre: Livre sur les Algonquins de Trois-Rivières, l'oral au secours de l'écrit 1600-2005 par Claude Hubert et Rémi Savard, préface de Denys Delâge, pages 117 et 118.

Voici le contenu de la lettre en question du Ministère des Affaires indiennes du Canada.


Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Affaires indiennes et du Nord Canada


Access to Information and Privacy
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0H4


Facsimile: (819 953-5492

Our file Notre référence: A-2000-0081

14 juin, 2000



Monsieur Claude Hubert
Société de Généalogie de Drummondville, No. 153
919, boulevard St.Charles
St.Charles de Drummondville (Québec)
J2C 4Y9


Monsieur Hubert:

La présente vise à répondre à votre demande dans laquelle vous avez réclamé, en vertu de la Loi sur l'accès à l'information,

"Votre Ministère a émis des numéros de bandes, nouveaux (après 1951 et anciens avant 1951) pour les indiens du Québec. Je veux savoir:

1. Si il y a encore un ou des numéros de bande en vigueur pour les Algonquins de Trois-Rivières?
2. Si oui, je désire obtenir le ou les numéros en vigueur.
3. Si non, je désire obtenir les anciens numéros en vigueur pour cette nation.
4. Si toutefois il n'y a plus de numéro en vigueur, je désire obtenir une copie du protocole, pour le droit à l'inscription. Voici
une copie du traité de Louis Juchereau Duchenay council with the indians Trois-Rivières, 26 octobre 1829, pour le territoire
concerné."


Nous avons fait des recherches sur le nom de Bande mentionné mais nous ne l'avons trouvé dans aucun de nos dossiers.

Cependant, une recherche géographique sur la région de Trois-Rivières nous a toutefois permis de trouver deux Bandes situées à proximité.

Bande portant au Ministère le numéro 071- La Bande des Abénakis de Bécancour a existé jusqu'en 1983, moment où elle a changé
officiellement de nom pour devenir la Bande des Abénakis de Wôlinak. Il convient de noter toutefois que le numéro de Bande
au Ministère n'a pas changé. La tribu des Abénakis est de descendance algonquine.

Bande portant au Ministère le numéro 072- La Bande d'Odanak est aussi de descendance algonquine. Il n'y a pas cependant pour eux de
de changement officiel de nom dans les dossiers et il n'y a pas eu non plus de numéros de Bande antérieurs.


En ce qui concerne votre question au sujet des critères utilisés pour l'inscription, j'ai joint une copie de la Loi sur les Indiens pour votre information.
Les articles 6 et 7 renferment ces critères, l'article 10 traite de l'appartenance, qui est déterminée par la Bande, et l'article 11 contient les critères
utilisés pour décider de l'appartenance à une Bande au niveau du Ministère.

Si vous avez des questions à ce sujet, veuillez communiquer avec Raymond Belleau au (819) 997-7874.

Veuillez agréer, Monsieur Hubert, l'expression de mes sentiments distingués.


La Coordonnatrice
Accès à l'information et protection
des renseignements personnels

(signé) Diane Leroux
jdelisle
Membre
 
Messages: 220
Inscrit le: 2007-05-21, 19:05

Re: Marie Olivier Manitouabeouich , Algonquine

Messagepar jdelisle » 2015-02-19, 14:24

Abitawis a écrit:ENGLISH TRANSLATION AT THE BOTTOM

Kwé !

Les Algonquins (Anishinabek), les Abénakis (Alnôbak) et les Hurons (Wendat) étaient au début de la colonisation et sont encore de nos jours identifiés comme étant des nations distinctes les unes des autres.

Ainsi, contrairement à ce qui est affirmée ci-haut, le PRDH (Fiche # 63388 Individu) identifie Marie Olivier Ouchistaouichkoué Manitouabeouich, épouse de Martin Prévost, comme étant une amérindienne « Algonquine » et non pas une « Huronne » ou même une «Abénakise» ou encore moins une « Algonquienne Abénakise ».

Son origine comme Algonquine de Nation est basée sur des documents historiques irréfutables et non sur de la spéculation, des chimères ou des belles histoires.

En effet, il existe bel et bien au moins deux documents historiques originaux disponibles dans les Archives Nationales du Québec qui, sous la signature notariée de Martin Prévost en 1661 et 1668 respectivement, confirment bien clairement qu’elle était une « sauvagesse Algonquine de Nation » et non une « Huronne » ou une « Abénaquise » avec tout le respect dû à ces trois nations dites « sauvage » pour lesquelles on faisait la distinction à l’époque tout comme on le fait encore de nos jours.

Voir les documents de source primaire originaux Français:

En 1661 (avant le décès de Marie Olivier en 1665): http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_cherche ... ide=905539

En 1668 (après le décès de Marie Olivier en 1665) : http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_cherche ... ide=828227

Martin Prévost, époux et père des 8 enfants de Marie Olivier, est la personne la plus compétente et la plus crédible pour confirmer la nation autochtone exacte de son épouse et, ipso facto, celle de ses parents. Il l’a aimé comme épouse pendant 21 années et la connaissait intimement. C’est beaucoup plus que tous les jésuites, curés, notaires, historiens, généalogistes, raconteurs d’histoires et spéculateurs passés et présents tous réunis.

Il est intéressant de noter que quoiqu’elle avait été élevée en grande partie à la « Française » et avait épousé un Français, ces deux (2) documents historiques démontrent clairement que Marie Olivier s’identifiait et a toujours été identifiée toute sa vie, autant par son époux que par les colons Français et la Nation des Algonquins, comme étant une «sauvagesse » de la Nation des Algonquins (Anishinabek).

Elle était Algonquine (Anishinabekwe) à l’époque. Elle demeure Algonquine (Anishinabekwe) aujourd’hui.

Mig8etch !

======================================================
TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE CI-HAUT


Kwey !

The Algonquins (Anishinabek), Abenakis (Alnôbak) and Hurons (Wendat) were at the beginning of the colonisation and still are today identified as distinct nations from one another.

Contrary to what is being asserted above, PRDH (File # 63388 Individual) identifies Marie Olivier Ouchistaouichkoué Manitouabeouich, wife of Martin Prévost, as an “Algonquin Indian” and not as a “Huron”, or an “Abénaki” or even as an “Abenaki Algonquian”.

Her Algonquin Nation origin is based on irrefutable historical documents and not on speculation or imagination or tall tales.

In fact, there are at least two original historical verifiable documents available in the National Archives of Quebec that, under the notarized signature of Martin Prévost in 1661 and 1668 respectively, confirms very clearly that she was a “Savage of the Algonquin Nation” (French: Sauvagesse Algonquine de Nation) and not “Huron” or “Abenaki” all due respect to these three so called “savage” nations that were distinguished from one another at the time and still are today.

Here are the primary source original French documents:

In 1661 (before Marie Olivier death in 1665): http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_cherche ... ide=905539

In 1668 (after Marie Olivier death in 1665): http://pistard.banq.qc.ca/unite_cherche ... ide=828227

Martin Prévost, husband and father of Marie Olivier 8 children, is the most competent and credible person to confirm the exact aboriginal nation of his wife and, ipso facto, that of her parents. He loved her as his wife for 21 years and knew her intimately. This is much more that can be said of all the Jesuits, priests, notaries, historians, genealogists, story tellers and speculators past and present combined.

It is interesting to note that even though she was raised in great part in the French manner and had married a Frenchman, these two (2) documents clearly demonstrate that she identified and was always identified all her life, by her spouse as well as the French colonists and the Algonquin Nation as a “savage” of the Algonquin Nation (Anishinabek).

She was an Algonquin (Anishinabekwe) then. She is an Algonquin (Anishinabekwe) today.

Meegwetch !



NOTE: vous avez mentionné: Contrary to what is being asserted above, PRDH (File # 63388 Individual) identifies Marie Olivier Ouchistaouichkoué Manitouabeouich, wife of Martin Prévost, as an “Algonquin Indian” and not as a “Huron”, or an “Abénaki” or even as an “Abenaki Algonquian”.

Contrairement à ce que vous affirmez le PRDH (File # 63388 individual) identifie Marie Olivier Ouchistaouichkoué Manitouabeouich, wife of Martin Prévost, as a “Huron indian ant not as Algonquin indian.”

VOICI CE QUE DIT LE PRDH # 63388:

Vous n'avez qu'à cliquer sur le lien suivant:

Certificat d'individu No. 63388. :
http://www.leveillee.net/ancestry/individu63388.htm

Note: Personnellement, je crois plutôt que Marie Manitouabeouich était Algonquine mais reliée à la tribu des Abénakis car sa mère Outchibahabanoukoueou serait née à Bécancour parmi les indiens de Bécancour qui étaient des Abénakis. Quant au père de Marie, il serait né en Huronnie , sud de l'Ontario. De toute façon, comme vous le dites si bien, son mari, Martin Prévost précise que son épouse Marie est Algonquine ainsi que les Jésuites de l'époque. Cependant, Tanguay mentionne que Marie est Huronne de Nation. Aussi, Marie Manitouabeouich ainsi que son père Roch font partie de la liste des Algonquins reconnus chez les Algonquins de l'Ontario alors que la mère de Marie ne fait aucunement partie de leur liste comme Algonquine (Anishinabek).

Bonne lecture et je crois qu'il faudrait apporter les corrections nécessaires dans le PRDH comme quoi Marie est Algonquine et non pas Huronne pour éviter de la confusion ou du moins mentionner les deux nationalités. Plusieurs Abénakis d'Odanak ont Marie Manitouabeouich comme ancêtre et non seulement les Abénakis du Vermont. Quant à Wôlinak, je n'ai pas vérifié. Référer à ce sujet aux sites généalogiques de Jutras et Descôteaux.

Voici leurs sites:

Claude Jutras
http://www.cjutras.org/

Généalogie Descôteaux
http://www.genealogiedescoteaux.com/
Noms de famille


Bonne lecture et bonnes recherches!
jdelisle
Membre
 
Messages: 220
Inscrit le: 2007-05-21, 19:05

Re: Marie Manitouabe8ich, Algonquine Abénaquise

Messagepar mhp » 2015-05-29, 00:07

Avec tout le respect que j'ai pour les démarches et les recherches qui ont été
entreprises et citées plus haut, il me semble très surprenant que Rock Manitouabe8ich
fut de la Nation Huronne.

Le nom Manitouabe8ich est clairement "algonquien", provient de Manitù (ou Manito) le
Grans Esprit. Ce n'est pas dutout un mot à consonance huronne. Je mentionne
"algonquien' car toutes les nations algonquiennes (Cree, Innu, Attikamek, MikMak,
Malécite, Naskapis, Abenakis, Anishinaabe, Ojibwe) possède le terme Manitù
dans leurs langues.

Je ne sais pas d'où vient l'information sur la naissance de Rock Manitouabe8ich mais
il aurait pu effectivement être né près du Lac Huron sans être huron. Plusieurs
des peuples Anishinaabe, Ojibwe comme les Nipissing vivaient dans cette région
et ont eu des relations très fortes avec Champlain, Étienne Brûlé et Nicolet.
mhp
Membre
 
Messages: 5
Inscrit le: 2011-09-26, 22:53


Retour vers Sur la Piste des Métis

Qui est en ligne ?

Utilisateur(s) parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur inscrit et 1 invité