Blue Jacket

Recherches ancestrales

Blue Jacket

Messagepar Dianepl » 2013-02-21, 16:48

Blue Jacket. Il est cité Blue Jacket et a épousé la fille de Baby Duperron ou Babie Dupéront et Suzanne Réaume de la Croix, ou simplement Suzanne de la Croix. Il est dit Chef des Chaouénons de la tribu des Hurons. Est-ce que quelqu'un a plus de détails? Son épouse est sans doute née autour de 1775 dans la région de Windsor (Sandwich) en Ontario. Dans cette famille, on mentionne aussi la Baie de Néaouaré.
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Re: Blue Jacket

Messagepar titesorciere » 2013-02-21, 17:29

Bonjour
Avez vous des enfants de ce couple ?
Marie Therese

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Re: Blue Jacket

Messagepar titesorciere » 2013-02-21, 17:47

Je ne pas sure si cela a rapport avec lui vu la différence de naissance
que vous supposez de sa femme Suzanne (V :1775)
Ce que je met ne va pas avec la naissance donné mais au cas ou..
Ce serait possible ….
BLUE JACKET Wehyehpiherhsehnwah Blue Jacket
Naissance 1735 dans Pennsylvania, United States
Décès 1810 à Ohio, United States

Mariage a …….Clear Water Baby Baby
Naissance 1750 dans River, Cleveland, North Carolina, United States
Décès 1832 à Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri, United States


http://trees.ancestry.ca/tree/16681749/ ... 9491?ssrc=
Marie Therese

On va toujours trop loin pour ceux qui vont nulle part !
titesorciere
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Re: Blue Jacket

Messagepar titesorciere » 2013-02-21, 17:55

Je vous met ce que je trouve...sous toute prudence !
mais trellement intéressant !!

Revenir à Chief BLUE JACKET W Blue Jacket

Press release on Bluejacket vs. Swearingen
10 Dec 2004
Ventura, CA, Friday December 10, 2004

Eleven DNA specimens (seven from Blue Jacket descendants and four from Swearingen descendants have been received by Technical Assoc., Ventura, CA and the necessary separation, etc. of DNA from these male descendants is in progress. Final analysis will await Marc Taylor's return to the lab from a trip he is on and he wants to personally do the final analysis himself. The results will be sent to Dr. Krane who, along with Carrie Rowland (center of photo) will write the report.

Who was Blue Jacket?
Little is known of Blue Jacket's early life. In 1877, decades after his death, a story was published claiming that Blue Jacket was in fact a white man named Marmaduke Van Swearingen, who had been captured and adopted by the Shawnee around the time of the American Revolutionary War. This story was popularized in books written by Allan Eckert, and remains well known in Ohio, where an outdoor drama celebrating the life of the white Indian chief is performed year after year in Xenia, Ohio.

Despite the persistence of this tale, many have questioned its authenticity. Academic historians such as Blue Jacket biographer John Sugden and the late Francis Jennings consider Eckert's books, which are billed as history, to be works of fiction. In 2000, DNA testing of the descendants of Blue Jacket and Van Swearingen gave additional support to the argument that Blue Jacket was not Van Swearingen. According to Sugden, nothing in the contemporary historical record indicates that Blue Jacket was anything other than a Shawnee Indian by birth.

more: http://www.answers.com/blue%20jacket

http://trees.ancestry.ca/tree/18687484/ ... id%7cpgNum
Marie Therese

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titesorciere
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Re: Blue Jacket

Messagepar titesorciere » 2013-02-21, 17:57

Meme lien ....

Blue Jacket was all Indian - Study, DNA results News Article
DAYTON DAILY NEWS, APRIL 15, 2006 Blue Jacket was all Indian, study says

By Benjamin Kline
Staff Writer

FAIRBORN — Research into the genetic family trees of the Shawnee Chief Blue Jacket and the white settler Marmaduke van Swearingen has concluded they were not the same person, as has been popularly thought since the 1800s, a Wright State University researcher said Friday.

" I can say with confidence that Blue Jacket was not Van Swearingen," associate professor of biomedical sciences Dan Krane said.

Krane and an associate, Carrie Rowland, have been alloted 15 minutes to present their findings at the Ohio Academy of Sciences meeting at the University of Dayton next weekend. They also get to place an article in the Ohio Journal of Science detailing their research.

A 19th-century writer apparently created the controversy in 1877 when he said Blue Jacket was actually van Swearingen, a white Shawnee captive who grew to be a noted warrior. In a dramatic twist, the chief was said to have killed one of his white brothers in the great Indian victory over the U.S. Army along the Wabash River in today's Mercer County.

Robert Van Trees, 88, of Fairborn, an amateur historian, has been a tireless enthusiast in the collection of DNA that enabled Krane's research, spanning seven or more generations of van Swearingen and Blue Jacket descendants.

The study focused unsolicited attention on the Greene County outdoor theater production of an action play called Blue Jacket.
" The Blue Jacket people are happy to know they have a direct line back to Blue Jacket and that he was a Shawnee," Krane said. "Now they have proof through their shared DNA."

The results were known in 2000, but DNA testing has advanced since then, Krane said.
Marie Therese

On va toujours trop loin pour ceux qui vont nulle part !
titesorciere
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Re: Blue Jacket

Messagepar titesorciere » 2013-02-21, 18:09

Le seul endroit ou j'ai vu ce mariage ...on dit de demander l'acces ...

Nicholas & Henson Family Tree
Arbre public de membre
3 résultats joints, 5 sources photos
Chief BLUE JACKET Wehyehpiherhsehnwah Blue Jacket
Naissance : 1735 - United States (États-Unis)
Décès : 1810 - Ohio, United States (États-Unis)
Mariage : 1765 - Ohio
Conjoint(e) : Clear Water Baby Baby

P :
Pride Wawwaythi Lawaquaqua Lawachkamikee Lawakwakwa Lawpkaway Opessa
M :
RISING SUN "Kishpoko" Techacha Morning Star Techacha Morning Star

http://trees.ancestry.ca/pt/RequestTree ... -758565990
Marie Therese

On va toujours trop loin pour ceux qui vont nulle part !
titesorciere
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Re: Blue Jacket

Messagepar titesorciere » 2013-02-21, 18:22

Lorsque j,ai mis en demande sur Ancestry ce nom '' Lawakwakwa Lawpkaway Opessa ''
on m' a donné ''Shawnee Woman ''
PS:: j'ai vu ce nomn au fil de marecherche...

http://trees.ancestry.ca/tree/48172797/ ... src=search
Marie Therese

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Re: Blue Jacket

Messagepar Dianepl » 2013-02-21, 18:52

Merci énormément pour tous ces détails. J'ignore si c'est le "bon" Blue Jacket mais c'est des plus intéressants. Je fais une compilation de tout ça.
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Re: Blue Jacket

Messagepar titesorciere » 2013-02-21, 19:03

Comme je vous disait dans ma réponse '' y a difference dans la date de naissance ''
mais j'espere vous avoir aidé un peu !!
merci de votre suivie a cette réponse !|'
Marie Therese

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titesorciere
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Re: Blue Jacket

Messagepar Dianepl » 2013-02-21, 21:00

Voici ce que j'ai concernant le père de l'épouse de Blue Jacket. On le cite Jacques né le 4 janvier 1731 et décédé le 2 août 1789 à Detroit. Cependant, un autre frère nommé Jacques né en 1731 et décédé en 1756 était marié à Angélique Crevier dit St-François en 1750 à Saint-François-du-Lac.

Celui décrit ci-bas a sans contredit eu d'étroits liens avec les autochtones.

Vous trouverez plus de détails sur la famille Babie dit Dupéront ou Baby dit Duperron sur mon site: www.geneaweb.org/perron

BABY, dit Dupéront (Dupéron, Duperron), JACQUES, fur-trader and Indian department employee; baptized 4 Jan. 1731 at Montreal (Que.); m. c. 23 Nov. 1760 at Detroit (Mich.) to Susanne Réaume (Rhéaume), dit La Croix; 11 of their 22 children survived to adulthood; d. c. 2 Aug. 1789 at Detroit.

Jacques Baby de Ranville, grandfather of Jacques Baby, dit Dupéront, was a scion of the decayed nobility of southern France and a sergeant in the Régiment de Carignan-Salières who married in Canada and settled as a rural merchant and farmer. Ranville’s son Raymond first went west with the fur brigades at age 15. In 1721 Raymond married Thérèse Le Comte Dupré, daughter of a Montreal family deeply involved in the fur trade although of seigneurial rank. Their son Dupéront therefore shared that heritage so significant in early Canadian history of vague pretensions to nobility coupled with dynamic participation in the fur trade and residency in Montreal.

When Dupéront first went west is unknown, but by 1753 he was a trader and Indian agent at Chiningué (Logstown, now Ambridge, Pa). In the Seven Years’ War he, his elder brother Louis, and his youngest brother Antoine were all trading in the west and saw military service in the Ohio valley alongside France’s Indian allies. A fourth brother, François*, handled the Montreal end of Antoine’s and Dupéront’s business on a partnership basis that would last until the death of Antoine in 1765. After the fall of Canada in 1760 Dupéront refused to swear allegiance to George III; and being, in Colonel Henry Bouquet’s words, “of a family noted for their influence among the Indians,” he was prevented from touring the western posts to collect his debts before returning to Montreal. His posture as a French patriot led to his arrest and temporary incarceration at Detroit on a groundless charge of plotting with Indians against the British occupying forces.

Dupéront’s intention was to leave Canada for France, there to join François, who had been sent to England as a prisoner of war. But upon arrival at Montreal in the autumn of 1761 Dupéront learned that François was moving their commercial relations from La Rochelle and Bordeaux to London, their French correspondents transferring cash balances and providing necessary letters of introduction. Dupéront also found that he was able to sell his furs advantageously at Montreal and that market prospects were good. He and his wife therefore returned to Detroit, the base of his operations, probably in the autumn of 1762.

Since he was permitted to return west, Dupéront had presumably taken the oath of allegiance at Montreal. He made his new position clear in Pontiac*’s uprising by first supplying the besieged British garrison at Detroit and then openly joining it. In 1777 he was appointed a captain and interpreter in the department of Indian affairs and was acting commissary in 1779. Although the latter office might seem to have entailed business advantages, Governor Haldimand’s aide-de-camp, Dietrich Brehm, stated in a letter from Detroit to his superior that “Mr. Baby now is not able to mind his own bisnis of trade being interely taken up by the maniging of Indiens” and that he should therefore receive higher pay than the “common and lowlified interpreters.”

Dupéront lost considerably by the discredit of Canada’s paper money after the conquest. The difficult business climate of the decades that followed is mirrored in his letters to François. He notes the swelling of the ranks of traders after 1765 (rightly predicting “the confusion will be dispelled by the ruin of the greatest number”), a change in market demand from beaver to luxury furs, the increasing competition of traders from Albany and New York who, he wrote, “sell here at almost as low a price as we buy at Quebec,” and the deterioration of the trade, especially after the American revolution. The year 1772 was the first in which he received fewer furs than he had anticipated.

But Dupéront survived and prospered. Indeed, his 1785 outfit was the largest of his career, £5,000. He was undoubtedly a vigorous trader, admired by the Indians, demanding with regard to the quality of his merchandise, insistent on the early arrival of outfits each year, and having the competitive advantage of residency. From an early date he diversified his economic base by the development of lands. He had received several grants of land from Indian tribes in addition to his purchases. By 1789 he had 1,440 acres of developed land with two water-driven mills on the American side of the Detroit River and 720 acres on the British side. He also had an immense timber reserve northwest of Lake St Clair, given him by the Ojibwas. The value of his estate at his death cannot be determined with certainty; his will forbade his children to bother their mother with demands for an inventory. When she did authorize an inventory in 1800, the estate totalled about £24,570, most of it invested with Alexander Ellice* of London. That this money had formerly been invested in New York, either by Dupéront or his heirs, suggests the possibility that he may have developed trade relations with that city in his later years. It was his son James* (Jacques) who withdrew these American investments in 1793 and transferred the proceeds to London.

At his death Dupéront was 58, one-eyed, worn down by the rigours of frontier life, but not an old man. He did not live long enough to enjoy the dignified appointments he had received: a commission of the peace in 1784, the lieutenant-colonelcy of the Detroit militia in 1787, and a seat on the land board for the District of Hesse in 1788. His correspondence and actions suggest that he was straightforward, impulsive, and marked by the stubborn tenacity of the self-made man. His letters contain many thundering denunciations of his competitors, yet they also bear witness to the warmth and humour of a generous personality. Certainly his contemporaries admired him. “Poor Baby died at Detroit about the first of August, universally regretted,” wrote the fur-trader John Richardson*. “He has not left such a Frenchman behind him.”

Dale Miquelon

ANQ-M, État civil, Catholiques, Notre-Dame de Montréal, 4 janv. 1731. ANQ-Q,
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Re: Blue Jacket

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